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Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage

Creator:

Chung, C.S.Y., et al

Subject Keywords: Cognitive rehabilitation, Executive Dysfunction, Adults, Stroke, Non-progressive acquired brain injury
Set: Chronic Conditions
Conditions
Stroke
Type: Article
Region: International (other)
Description:

Executive function is the term used to describe the brain processes that we use to organise ourselves and solve problems. Executive function is frequently affected when the brain is damaged through trauma or from an internal cause such as a stroke. It has been estimated that around 75% of people will have executive function difficulties after a stroke. People with executive function difficulties (executive dysfunction) often find it difficult to learn new ways of doing daily activities, such as dressing themselves. This can make it very difficult for them to learn ways to deal with other problems, such as movement difficulties, which also occur as a result of their brain injury. Cognitive rehabilitation is a type of therapy that aims to improve people's attention, memory or executive function. If it is possible to improve executive function, then more people with brain injury might become more independent with activities of daily living, and might respond better to their rehabilitation. We investigated how effective cognitive rehabilitation interventions are at improving executive function after brain injury. We found 19 relevant studies involving 907 people. We were able to combine the results of 13 of these studies including 660 participants (395 traumatic brain injury, 234 stroke, 31 other acquired brain injury). Only two of the studies (82 people) reported the outcome in which we were most interested (a general measure of executive function). We found no evidence that cognitive rehabilitation interventions were helpful for people with executive dysfunction for any other outcomes. We recommend that more research is carried out to determine whether cognitive rehabilitation can improve executive function after stroke and brain injury.

Date:

30/04/2013

Rights: © The Cochrane Collaboration
Suggested citation:

Chung, C.S.Y., et al. (2013) Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage [Online]. Available from: http://www.thehealthwell.info/node/479345 [Accessed: 23rd January 2018].

  

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